So Many Great Career Paths in the IUPAT!

The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades represents men and women who work in what are called the Finishing Trades – Commercial Painting (offices, hotels and homes), Industrial Painting (factories, ships and bridges), glazing and glasswork, drywall finishing and sign and display.  Those are just a few of the over 30 crafts we represent throughout the United States and Canada.

Drywall Finisher

Drywall finishers (or tapers) prepare unfinished interior drywall panels for painting by taping and finishing joints and imperfections.

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Floor Coverer

Floor covering professionals install carpeting, sheet vinyl flooring, tile and laminate and hardwood floors. Their work adds the finishing touches to both homes and commercial buildings like high-rise offices, hotels and hospitals.

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Glazier

Glaziers install and repair windows, mirrors, architectural aluminum windows and door framing, shower/bath enclosures, automatic doors, plastics and exterior panels. They’re the men and women who give those towering glass skyscrapers their shine!
Glassworkers fabricate aluminum doors and windows, insulated glass units, show doors, mirrors and glass tabletops.

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Hydro Blaster/Vacuum Technician

These workers operate and maintain high pressure water blasting equipment and industrial vacuuming equipment to perform the proper removal and disposal of both hazardous and non-hazardous materials for the purpose of cleaning.

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Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialist (CAS)

Apprentices and journey workers in this trade are certified and highly specialized industrial painters whose work protects the iron and steel in our nation’s bridges, power generation plants and other super structures from the elements.

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Painter-Decorator

Painters and wall covering professionals work in all kinds of commercial and industrial environments, from work that takes a few days to large-scale projects that can take weeks or months to complete.

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Sign and Display

Sign and display craft persons design, construct, paint and erect signage and trade show exhibits using a wide range of materials. Apprentices in this trade learn to specialize in graphic design, fabrication, silk-screening or installation.

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Trade Show

A career in the trade show craft encompasses a wide range of skills and tasks. At a trade show, you will see booths and displays of all sorts. Displays range in size and detail from a small portable display to a large, elaborate, multi-level custom-designed exhibit. Trade show workers assemble and build exhibits in shops, as well as install and dismantle them at show locations.
The display installers’ profession is part of one of the fastest growing industries in the country. Convention centers are springing up all over the world and are constantly expanding and improving facilities in order to attract more clientele in this increasingly competitive market.

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You Should Know

man holding a paint roller

More Facts

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that construction managers made $93,900 a year on average as of May 2011.
The highest-paid 10 percent of managers earned over $149,070 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 percent made less than $50,650.
Fifty percent of construction managers earned between $64,780 and $112,020 a year.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health, welfare, and pension benefits, more political influence, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.
The FTI and its regional training centers provide craft-specific training, education, and on-the-job learning opportunities in 8 apprenticeable crafts.
FTI instructors are craft experts trained in the development and use of instructional aides, communication skills and classroom organizational techniques, as well as adult learning principles.
The FTI uses a DOL approved program of study for each of the trades it represents.
Students of the FTI learn through classroom instruction and hands-on skills practice with industry experts.
FTI students are employable.
You will be trained to work according to safe work practices and to recognize health and safety hazards to yourself, your co-workers, and the surrounding environment.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health and welfare benefits, full employment, more political influence, better pension benefits, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and more money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.