Drywall Finisher

Drywall consists of a thin layer of gypsum between two layers of heavy paper.  It is both faster and cheaper to install than plaster and is, therefore, widely used today in most buildings on both ceilings and walls.

A Drywall Finisher must measure, cut and fit drywall panels around mechanical structures.  Once the required fittings are made, the drywall panels are attached to the wood or metal framework using glue, nails or screws.  One or more Drywall Finisher apprentices will work together to lift the heavy and cumbersome drywall panels into position to secure them to the framework.  Oftentimes, a Drywall Finisher will use a lifting device when placing drywall panels on a ceiling.

Once the drywall has been securely installed, Tapers fill the joints between panels with a joint compound.  Using the wide, flat edge of a hand held trowel, Tapers spread the compound into and along each side of all joints and angles with brush-like strokes.  Immediately after spreading the compound, a paper tape is pressed into the wet compound to reinforce the drywall and to smooth away excess compound material.  The same compound is also used to cover nail and screw depressions in the panel caused by the installation of mechanical structures.

You Should Know

man holding a paint roller

More Facts

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that construction managers made $93,900 a year on average as of May 2011.
The highest-paid 10 percent of managers earned over $149,070 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 percent made less than $50,650.
Fifty percent of construction managers earned between $64,780 and $112,020 a year.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health, welfare, and pension benefits, more political influence, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.
The FTI and its regional training centers provide craft-specific training, education, and on-the-job learning opportunities in 8 apprenticeable crafts.
FTI instructors are craft experts trained in the development and use of instructional aides, communication skills and classroom organizational techniques, as well as adult learning principles.
The FTI uses a DOL approved program of study for each of the trades it represents.
Students of the FTI learn through classroom instruction and hands-on skills practice with industry experts.
FTI students are employable.
You will be trained to work according to safe work practices and to recognize health and safety hazards to yourself, your co-workers, and the surrounding environment.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health and welfare benefits, full employment, more political influence, better pension benefits, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and more money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.

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