Floor Coverer

Floor Coverers add decorative qualities to their finished work that enhance the appeal of the building. Work is typically done in homes, offices, hospitals, stores, restaurants, and in many other structures.  Workers in the floor covering trade must be able to work with plans and/or blueprints and apply math skills to measure, purchase, and install the materials for the best possible finished floor. Workers in this trade must also be able to inspect floor surfaces for imperfections and know how to correct the flaw prior to beginning the job.

Skills needed to become carpet and floor finishers include manual dexterity, eye-hand coordination, physical fitness, and a good sense of balance and color. The ability to solve arithmetic problems quickly and accurately is also needed.

Although the work is labor intensive, the conditions under which Floor Coverers typically work are favorable since most construction has been completed and the work area is relatively clean and uncluttered.

You Should Know

man holding a paint roller

More Facts

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that construction managers made $93,900 a year on average as of May 2011.
The highest-paid 10 percent of managers earned over $149,070 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 percent made less than $50,650.
Fifty percent of construction managers earned between $64,780 and $112,020 a year.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health, welfare, and pension benefits, more political influence, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.
The FTI and its regional training centers provide craft-specific training, education, and on-the-job learning opportunities in 8 apprenticeable crafts.
FTI instructors are craft experts trained in the development and use of instructional aides, communication skills and classroom organizational techniques, as well as adult learning principles.
The FTI uses a DOL approved program of study for each of the trades it represents.
Students of the FTI learn through classroom instruction and hands-on skills practice with industry experts.
FTI students are employable.
You will be trained to work according to safe work practices and to recognize health and safety hazards to yourself, your co-workers, and the surrounding environment.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health and welfare benefits, full employment, more political influence, better pension benefits, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and more money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.

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