Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialist (CAS)

Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialists apply techniques to prepare substrates for coating and lining application. Techniques may include removal of rust, mill scale and previously applied hazardous coatings utilizing industry‐specific tools and techniques. Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialists apply/install protective coatings and linings to steel and concrete on complex structures, such as bridges and towers; waterfront structures, such as locks and dam, ship hulls, offshore platforms, bulkheads, and piers; metal and manufacturing facilities; chemical and processing facilities (e.g. food processing; pulp and paper mills; food and beverage plants; water and wastewater processing facilities); and conventional and nuclear power generation facilities.

By the nature of their work, Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialists often work in dangerous environments such as bridges high over waterways, other highways or railroads, or in confined spaces such as shipboard spaces, small vessels or storage tanks. Because of this, Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialists are required to receive more specialized training in health and safety due to the hazards associated with their work.

In today’s environmentally‐conscious culture, the Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialist must also be careful to protect the environment surrounding the work site to ensure that hazardous debris such as lead‐based paint and abrasive blasting media is properly contained and disposed of according to stringent federal, state and local regulations. This often requires the rigging of intricate containment systems and work platforms.

Students will learn to apply their theoretical knowledge and skills to the corrosion protection of steel and concrete on complex industrial structures through course work in Health and Safety Awareness for Application Specialists, surface preparation and coating materials properties, and application. Specialty application course work in plural component and thermal spray will further assist students in expanding their skills. Students will have their capabilities verified thru the IUPAT/FTI Industrial Coating and Lining Application Specialist Certification Program.

The objective of the Certification Program is to determine, through proctored written and practical examination, whether an individual craft worker has the skill and knowledge to perform quality surface preparation and protective coatings application. The ICLAS program meets this need and provides criteria for the education, training, experience, knowledge, and motor skills required to prepare and apply protective coatings to steel and concrete surfaces of complex industrial and marine structures.

This training and certification has been designed to meet the requirements for a Level II certified Coating and Lining Application Specialist set forth in the Body of Knowledge contained within the SSPC ACS 1/NACE No.13 Joint Standard and in accordance with ISO 17024. Students shall be required to maintain their Qualifications per the requirements set forth in the SSPC ACS 1/NACE No.13 Joint Standard.

You Should Know

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More Facts

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that construction managers made $93,900 a year on average as of May 2011.
The highest-paid 10 percent of managers earned over $149,070 a year, while the lowest-paid 10 percent made less than $50,650.
Fifty percent of construction managers earned between $64,780 and $112,020 a year.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health, welfare, and pension benefits, more political influence, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.
The FTI and its regional training centers provide craft-specific training, education, and on-the-job learning opportunities in 8 apprenticeable crafts.
FTI instructors are craft experts trained in the development and use of instructional aides, communication skills and classroom organizational techniques, as well as adult learning principles.
The FTI uses a DOL approved program of study for each of the trades it represents.
Students of the FTI learn through classroom instruction and hands-on skills practice with industry experts.
FTI students are employable.
You will be trained to work according to safe work practices and to recognize health and safety hazards to yourself, your co-workers, and the surrounding environment.
An average union construction worker makes more than the average computer worker and has better benefits than the average big company employee.
Construction work employs more people in North America than most any other industry.
Union construction commands higher wages, better health and welfare benefits, full employment, more political influence, better pension benefits, better working conditions, more bargaining power, and more money for training.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, 8.7 million Americans worked in construction as of 2010.
As of 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median wage for basic construction laborers was $29,280 a year.

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